Ennara and the Book of Shadows

Ennara Book 2

Ennara and the Book of Shadows by Angela Myron is book two from the Ennara Series. You may recall I reviewed book one Ennara and the Fallen Druid. Ennara goes on another adventure with her friends Kithe and Gevin. They must find artifacts then destroy the Book of Shadows that has cast a spell and spread beyond their school.

There is a budding romance. This time around, Ennara sees Gevin in a different light. Like the previous book, Ennara’s feelings are shown. For a middle-grade book, the romance is just glances or the touch of a hand or blushing. Ennara has to save everyone’s life in the end, which brings the group closer. It makes sense that there are bubbling feelings. Then there’s the new girl Cinne, who Kithe begins to like. Cinne has an earthy power that allows her to touch the ground and start an earthquake or sandstorm. Together Cinne and Ennara are dangerous with their magical gifts, which is creative and unexpected.

The politics are well thought out and could describe today’s chaotic, corrupt government. As the reader spends time at the Druidic Academy with the nerdy and odd professors it seems the Druidic Council tries to control beyond their reach. The Fallen Druid Ardewynn returns, who tests Ennara, but I don’t want to give away the ending. There is definitely room for Ardewynn to return in book three. Other characters like a robot, moving statues, pegasi, griffins, and dragons add a layer to the story.

Ennara’s complex world can keep the Ennara Series going for a long time. I can’t wait to read more of Ennara’s developing powers in book three Ennara and the Silver Throne.

Meg kaylo civa!

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Copyright 2018 Melissa Crismon

 

 

 

 

 

Much Ado About Talk

much ado dance
Sarah Topham as Beatrice, Michael Hayden as Benedick, Morgan Taylor as Hero, Carlos Angel-Barajas as Claudio and the company of Much Ado About Nothing, by William Shakespeare, directed by Kathleen Marshall, runs August 12 – September 16, 2018 at The Old Globe. Photo by Jim Cox.

Three-time Tony Award winner and director Kathleen Marshall frolics through a post-war Italian Riviera playground at the Old Globe in Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. She’s the perfect hostess from the masque ball to a wedding that almost happens, and a celebration with a company dance.

In a bathing suit and fiery, tight-curled hair, Beatrice (Sarah Topham) enters with a confident stride through the French doors with Hero (Morgan Taylor) through the other. The lovable, sassy Beatrice makes it clear to her uncle (Leonato as René Thornton Jr.) she is not interested in love. She and Benedick (Michael Hayden) have a charming chemistry that everyone notices but them. Benedick is older than she is, which makes sense, since he swears he will die a bachelor.

Scenic design, by John Lee Beatty, lends itself as a comedic hideaway and complementary surrounding. The pink villa casts a cheery and romantic glow on the actors. Benedick squirms from the greenery then crawls across the floor as Leonato lies to Don Pedro (Michael Boatman) and Claudio (Carlos Angel-Barajas) that Beatrice will kill herself if Benedick doesn’t return her love. Then Hero and Ursula (Larica Schnell) do the same and gossip of Benedick’s love for Beatrice. Beatrice stands in the statue niche then slinks behind the ladies to the fountain. She lies down as the girls lounge and twirl their hands below the waterline causing Beatrice to flatten herself on the step. When headstrong Beatrice and confirmed bachelor Benedick are properly set up, Benedick does a dance on the balcony in and out of the bedroom while Beatrice dances on the patio and through the French doors.

The men open the French doors and pause for the audience to take in the masks. There is a collective sigh as everyone gets a tickle out of the 1980s song “Puttin’ on the Ritz” by Taco, chosen by music director Abigail Grace Allwein. (Allwein also plays the violin with guitarist James Michael McHale.) The men do a smooth dance with a bend of the knees. Director Marshall has also won the Astaire Award—ergo all the dancing. From having fun with dog and pig masks, costume designer Michael Krass, celebrates the feminine with all the dresses. Beatrice’s red dress with spaghetti straps hugs her slim body then gradually flares out to her feet. Hero changes from her flowy pantsuit to a pleated pink-lavender dress to a damask and lace, cream wedding dress.

But Claudio and Hero’s wedding is interrupted as more lies are woven by jealous Don John (Manoel Felciano), the illegitimate brother of Don Pedro. Claudio has come home after the war with approval from Don Pedro. Don John conspires with his bad boys Borachio (Eric Weiman) and Conrade (Yadira Correa) dressed in black of course. When Borachio stands in the window with Margaret (Nora Carroll) groping her and calling out Hero’s name for Claudio to see, I can’t help but giggle even though it is mean spirited. The other tertiary character, gravel-voiced Conrade, channels Joan Jett as he smokes, drinks wine from a bottle, and spreads his legs when he sits. Conrad always has a pissed off face and with the same expression, as a prisoner, is forced to shake a gourd in the last song.

Much Ado About Nothing is a delightful romantic comedy. I’ve never enjoyed listening to a couple bicker more.

The Old Globe • Lowell Davies Festival Theatre • 1363 Old Globe Way, San Diego, CA, 92101 • August 12 – September 16, 2018 • (619) 234-5623

Copyright 2018 Melissa Crismon