Operation Sea Shepherd

Capt Paul Watson and Peter Hammarstedt 1
Captain Paul Watson and Captain Peter Hammarstedt, Oct. 7, 2018 at Beelman’s in Downtown L.A. Photo by Renaissance Man.

I finally meet Captain Paul Watson of Sea Shepherd. Even Peter Hammarstedt shows. I missed Watson in San Diego so we drive through trash strewn Skid Row and walk through the drugged out homeless of downtown L.A. Hanging out on a Sunday night isn’t usually my thing, but I can’t miss Captain Watson again!

On our way to Beelman’s, we find a familiar face talking to some guy on a bike waiting at the crosswalk. Renaissance Man says, “That was Andy Serkis,” then beats himself up for not stopping to say hi throughout the evening and the next day.

Renaissance Man keeps asking if a lot of people will be at the gathering. I keep saying, “No. Out of all the people I tell about Sea Shepherd only one knew.”

Here’s what I tell everybody when they tell me they haven’t heard of Captain Paul Watson and Sea Shepherd. Captain Paul is a co-founder of the Greenpeace Foundation. In 1977, Paul left Greenpeace and founded Sea Shepherd, a conservation group defending the sea. Watson is best known as an anti-whaler fighting the Japanese whalers in the best reality TV show EVER called Whale Wars on Animal Planet.

The show is no longer on, and Sea Shepherd no longer goes to Antarctica since they can’t justify spending charitable money for 333 minke whales. But it would be great if the show returned following other ships in the organization.

Through the patio at Beelman’s, we enter the yellow-booth, vegan restaurant, bar to the left. The Los Angeles Sea Shepherd Chapter has a small table of merchandise set up. The captain’s not there yet. We settle on a booth, and enjoy vegan pub food. The Dodgers are playing and some at the bar are cheering. I go over to get Renaissance Man a Sea Shepherd T-shirt when Captain Paul walks in. I start clapping. A few begin to clap. Captain stops and is a bit stunned by the enthusiasm. The Dodger fans continue watching their team while I cheer for Team Sea Shepherd.

“Is Peter here?” Watson asks one of the Sea Shepherd volunteers.

Watson makes his way to the bar with the people he knows. He drinks something in a faux coconut with an umbrella. Then Peter Hammarstedt walks in. One of the girls tries to get her boyfriend’s attention at the bar as she points at Peter.

Peter’s no longer that nineteen year old young man when he started out with Sea Shepherd. He’s filled out and he’s not wearing glasses anymore-the look I’m accustomed to from watching Whale Wars.

Eventually, the small crowd makes their way to the duo to get a photo with them. I wait patiently. No one is talking to them so I go up to both Watson and Hammarstedt.

“I wrote a book inspired by Whale Wars. You’re the captain.” I look up at Peter. “And you’re the first mate.”

“He’s my cabin boy.” From the chair, Captain Paul points at Peter standing to his side and laughs.

“You’ve been demoted,” I say. Turning back to Paul, “May I give you my book?”

“Sure.”

I know he’s an avid reader, which I tell him as I give him my book later in the evening. I don’t want him to have to carry my book Superfreak around. He looks at the cover. Flips the book over. A lady says from behind, “He’s going to sign books.” I believe he is walking to a table as someone had bought a book of his and wants it signed. He is an author himself and a good one. He wrote the book Earthforce! The book explains how governments never follow through to strategies for earth warriors to some of his beliefs. His knowledge of Spaceship Earth, as he calls it, is astounding and will blow your mind. (Man, now I’m really kicking myself for not asking him questions, but I was only thinking I’ve got to meet him.) Then Captains Paul and Peter speak to the crowd.

Paul talks about the world’s most endangered marine mammal—the vaquita porpoise. Earlier this year, M/V Farley Mowat and two other Sea Shepherd vessels returned to Mexico’s Gulf of California for Operation Milagro IV to help support the Mexican Navy protect the vaquita refuge. Local fishermen use illegal gillnets to kill endangered totoaba sea bass. Gillnets indiscriminately catch any species of fish, and drown marine mammals and birds.

Sea Shepherd volunteers removed 385 pieces of illegal deadly fishing gear and saved 854 animals—their most successful campaign for the vaquita to date.

Peter talks about seeing his first whale harpooned when he was fourteen years old. It was that whale that made him want to protect the whales and the seas. Peter is truly a kind soul. As soon as he could he joined Sea Shepherd at nineteen. He used to be the first mate on the M/V Bob Barker. He talks about his recent endeavor as captain on the M/V Bob Barker working with the government of Gabon on the west coast of Central Africa. He says a blacklisted vessel that was killing over a half million sharks a year was arrested. He personally tells me he had been patrolling off East Africa. So he put a lot of hours on the engine chasing illegal fishing boats. He reminds the crowd that our global ocean fisheries will be completely exploited by 2048. Each year, 300,000 whales and dolphins are killed as by-catch, 50 million sharks are caught as by-catch, and more than 100,000 sea turtles, seals, and other marine mammals are killed.

Paul asks if we have any questions. You know that part in the story where the author intrudes and says, she didn’t think to ask questions. At that moment, I don’t remember that I do have questions for him.

We are having a great evening sharing our booth with vegans and animal activists. They are supportive of my book and want to buy it. I give them my bookmarks. If I had brought more books, I would have given them away. It’s an eclectic bunch of compassionate people. And I’m hanging with two of the greatest defenders of the sea—Paul and Peter—truly the nicest people.

To donate to Sea Shepherd go to the donation page. In the comments, you can say Author Melissa Crismon told you about Sea Shepherd. Or shop Sea Shepherd for Christmas. One of the volunteers says the donations are well utilized by Sea Shepherd.

Sunny Pageant of the Masters

 

Pageant of the Masters Entry Wall
Under the Sun at Pageant of the Masters 2018 in Laguna Beach, California. Photo by M.C.

Through the years, Pageant of the Masters has focused on the masters like Cezanne, Monet, Manet, Van Gogh, Michelangelo, Picasso, Raphael, Renoir, Vermeer, Leonardo da Vinci, and other artists around the world. But this year the theme is Under the Sun.

The Festival of Arts is celebrating 85 years and the Laguna Art Museum 100 years. Act One celebrates California and quite a bit of Laguna Beach’s art history.

The show opens with a Native American woman dancing near a fire atop a hill, depicting early life in Laguna Beach. The easy storytelling voice of Narrator Richard Doyle explains that a woman’s skull was found in Laguna Beach, dating back 17,000 years! Below, on stage, From the Beginning by bronze sculptor Jorge Fernandez depicts Native Americans sitting and standing on a rock. The first paintings begin with California’s mission era. Toll for Sunrise Mass, Pala Mission by J. Henry Sandham portrays a Native American pulling mission bells in San Antonio, Texas.

Mexican Cattle in Southern California by Artist William Hahn
Mexican Cattle in Southern California, by Artist William Hahn, Oil on Canvas, 1883

Back to California, picturesque paintings show the ranchos like Mexican Cattle Drivers in Southern California by William Hahn, and lithographs of orange crate labels are re-enacted. Both remind me of my ancestral history as my family worked the land and my Mexican grandmother packed oranges in similar crates in an Orange County packing plant.

Also, the artists’ colony and Festival of Art beginning are shown. Robert Kuntz was Laguna’s Renaissance Man known for his oil on canvas of beach scenes, numbers on signs, and freeway overpasses. The New Waves section aerials into the famous The Endless Summer lithograph by John Van Hamersvelf and The Laguna Beach Boys perform a Beach Boys song. Beach balls go flying!

Dejeuner sur LHerbe Claude Monet
Déjeuner sur L’Herbe by Artist Claude Monet, Oil on Canvas, 1865-66

The music is exceptional. I even get a good view of harpist Amy Wilkins before the barrier raises covering the orchestra pit. There are many harp parts in Act Two. Impressionist composer Claude Debussy’s Arabesque No. 1 floats through the air, but with keyboard not the harp. Arabesque is a beautiful piece for the harp with syncopation, but not easy. Claude Monet’s Déjeuner sur L’Herbe comes together. The yellow skirt is snapped in place by a stagehand. Rarely are so many paintings shown coming together. Usually, you only see one painting from behind the scenes.

Catching a Fish at the Beach Bischoff
Catching a Fish at the Beach by Artist Franz A. Bischoff, Oil on Canvas, c. 1920

 

No photography is allowed of these “living pictures,” but a video has surfaced on YouTube of Catching Fish at the Beach by Laguna Beach artist Franz A. Bischoff at the Under the Sun production. Maybe revealing the secretive demonstration to the media is a new thing. I won’t put in the link. Seeing the painting made before you go will dampen some of the magic.

At the end as tradition stands, Leonardo di Vinci’s The Last Supper comes together. The apostles step up to the table then Jesus is helped up the steps. The audience is quiet. The life-size painting turns around and the frame is set in place. From behind me, the wife moans, “Oh. Oh. Oh. My. Goaah.” She’s in shock at what she sees. Then the husband says, “Oh Shit.” The young couple have been sipping margaritas for the past ninety minutes.

Pageant of the Masters is the show to see for all ages. Many locals haven’t gone. You are missing out. The natural setting of chaparral-covered hills on a warm night under the setting sun is a great way to create memories with your family and friends.

Opening Night is busy but we find street parking in front of the Sawdust. We feed $6.50 in quarters that lasts about four hours, but the meter takes credit cards too. There is a $7 pay lot on Laguna Canyon where you can take the trolley for free.

Be there or be square!

Pageant of the Masters and Festival of Arts, 650 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach, CA 92651. Pageant Tickets: 1-800-487-3378. Performances nightly, beginning at 8:30 p.m.: July 7-September 1, 2018.

Copyright 2018 Melissa Crismon